This is when to catch a glimpse of the Leonids meteor shower

Pablo Tucker
November 19, 2020

As per the report, meteor showers are best visible when the sky is cloudless and the entire sky can be seen, with a dimly lit Moon.

The Temple-Total comet, which takes 33 years to orbit the Sun, is close to Earth, an event that occurs over a period of about 15 years.

Leonid meteor shower: Have you been wanting to watch a meteor shower? Seismic instruments left on the surface by the Apollo missions have confirmed Leonid meteor showers striking the surface of the moon.

According to the UK Met Office most of the UK is expected to be covered in clouds in the next 24 hours so clear skies can be difficult to find
According to the UK Met Office most of the UK is expected to be covered in clouds in the next 24 hours so clear skies can be difficult to find

"Fireballs are larger explosions of light and color that can persist longer than an average meteor streak", NASA explained, due to their origination from "larger particles of cometary material".

The last Leonid meteor shower happened in 2001. Because what we are about to testify to is that Leo is believed to have come from the planet Tarsha, a group of stars that make up a lion's mane, called Leonids.

The diminutive Comet Tempel-Tuttle, the parent body of the Leonids, will cross Earth's orbit, creating a vaporizing shower of debris in the atmosphere. The Northern Tarits are also known for their fireballs, meaning that if you see a fireball or two it may have originated from that rain.


The chart shows the view looking east from London at midnight as 17 November becomes 18 November. The less the moon is illuminated, the better the chance to see the meteors.

"It's great to see just how many ideal stargazing spots there are as well as how many local authorities are now promoting their parks and outdoor spaces as stargazing spots".

Most of the UK is expected to be covered in clouds over the next 24 hours, so finding a clear sky may prove hard, according to the UK Met Office.


Unfortunately, this year's shower won't produce a meteor storm, which is when you can see upward of 1,000 meteors per hour. The Perseid meteor shower, for example, which was first observed a whopping 2,000 years ago, takes place in August annually.

Some meteor-viewing tips from EarthSky: "Find a dark sky away from pesky artificial lights, enjoy the comfort of a reclining lawn chair and sleeping bag, and enjoy watching the swift-moving and often bright Leonid meteor shower".


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