In recovering Covid-19 patients, antibodies fade quickly

Henrietta Brewer
October 17, 2020

People with blood type O may have a lower risk of infection from the SARS-CoV-2 virus, that causes COVID-19, and reduced likelihood of severe outcomes, including organ complications, if they develop the disease, two new studies suggest, the studies suggested.

As per the observations made according to these data, they concluded that people who had blood type O were less vulnerable whereas people with A and AB were more at risk. Around 42 percent of the Danish population has blood type O and another 42 percent have blood type A. Despite equal representation, fewer people with blood type O caught Covid-19; just 38 percent of the people who tested positive were blood type O, while 44 percent were blood type A. Similarly, people with blood type B and AB also received more positive Covid-19 results than expected.

Researchers also found the blood type A or AB group had longer stays in the intensive care unit, a median of 13.5 days, compared to the other group with blood type O or B who had a median of 9 days.


A separate retrospective study showed that blood groups A and AB "appear to exhibit greater COVID-19 disease severity than people with blood groups O or B". The findings indicate why the coronavirus is lethal for some and not so for the others.

The second research is based on almost 95 people from Vancouver, Canada who had tested positive for the virus.

Types A and AB also needed a sort of dialysis that helps the kidneys filter blood without putting too much pressure on the heart more often than their counterparts.


"It is very important to consider the proper control group because blood type prevalence may vary considerably in different ethnic groups and different countries", says study author Torben Barington, MD, of Odense University Hospital in a press release.

This lends credence to the fact that people with blood type A, B and AB, may be more at risk of getting infected than those with blood type O. After controlling for certain factors, they found fewer patients with blood type O, compared with patients with blood types A, B, and AB. Patients with type A or AB blood were more likely to require mechanical ventilation, suggesting that they had greater rates of lung injury from COVID-19. They can only receive transfusions from O positive or O negative blood types.

Lead author Dr Mypinder Sekhon, of the University of British Columbia, said: "Of particular importance as we continue to traverse the pandemic, we now have a wide range of survivors who are exiting the acute part of Covid-19, but we need to explore mechanisms by which to risk stratify those with longer-term effects".


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