No letup as global coronavirus cases pass 10m

Cheryl Sanders
June 29, 2020

The first cases of the new coronavirus were confirmed on January 10 in Wuhan in China, before infections and fatalities surged in Europe, then the United States, and later Russian Federation.

The number of new COVID-19 cases globally hit nearly 190-thousand on Sunday alone, according to data from the World Health Organization.

The tallies, using data collected by AFP from national authorities and information from the World Health Organization (WHO), probably reflect only a fraction of the actual number of infections.

With 5,08,953 total cases and over 15,000 fatalities, India continued to the fourth-worst hit country by COVID-19 across the globe.


Earlier on Sunday, WHO's daily COVID-19 report recorded yet another peak of daily new cases as several countries reported their highest number of new cases in a 24-hour period.

In Australia's state of Victoria, authorities recorded their highest daily jump in locally acquired Covid-19 cases since the pandemic began, with 75 people testing positive on Monday and only one confirmed to be a returned worldwide traveller.

In Beijing, where hundreds of new cases were linked to an agricultural market, testing capacity has been ramped up to 300,000 a day.

It's a number that many health experts believe massively underestimates the true picture of the pandemic's spread.


The US, which was on its way to reopening its economy, is also seeing a jump in new infections in big states such as Florida and California. Between June 21 and 27 the region registered 408,401 new cases, compared with 253,624 in the United States and Canada and 121,824 in Europe.

In total, Latin America has 2,432,558 infections with 110,695 deaths.

The United States topped the lists of both confirmed cases and deaths with 2,496,628 cases and 125,318 deaths, which was followed by Brazil with 1,313,667 cases and 57,070 deaths.

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