United Kingdom phone masts attacked over bogus 5G coronavirus conspiracies

Carla Harmon
April 5, 2020

Generally, they say radiation from the telecom networks caused illness to those nearby.

NHS England's national medical director, Stephen Powis, said the "theory" was complete nonsense.

5G phone masts are going on in the United Kingdom, after online conspiracy theories have wrongly linked cell towers to the coronavirus pandemic. the BBC reports that at least three 5G towers were lit last week, and police and fire services were called in to extinguish the flames.

Emergency solutions were called to a burning pole in Aintree near Liverpool on Friday, according to theLiverpool Echo Another 5G tower was likewise fired in south Liverpool, the Liverpool Echo reported.

Mobile UK, which stands for the U.K.'s mobile network drivers, blew up the 5G coronavirus conspiracy concepts.


"The reality is there is huge pressure on the network at the moment with so many people at home and that's why engineers are upgrading it".

When asked by a reporter about the so called "theory" that 5G telecommunications masts could play a role in the spread of the disease, British Cabinet Officer Minister Michael Gove said: "That is just nonsense, risky nonsense as well".

It now appears that the 5G conspiracy theories are being fueled by Russia-sponsored groups.

Cheers actor Woody Harrelson and former Dancing on Ice judge Jason Gardiner are among stars who have shared theories.

Dr Michael Head, a senior research fellow in global health at the University of Southampton, described the conspiracy theorists as "a public health danger who once read a Facebook page". "During this challenging situation, it is about groups # COVID19 pandemic to spread fundamental theories about the security of # 5G, & # 39; Tweeted it".


Furthermore, it is unusual that many people consider Wuhan as the first 5G city in the world.

While not entirely new, the conspiracy theory purporting a link between 5G and contagious diseases has picked up this week, with some British celebrities also joining in circulating it. These false conspiracy theories do not mention that a highly contagious virus would naturally spread in densely populated cities with access to 5G, and that the coronavirus pandemic has affected counties like Iran and Japan, where 5G is not yet in use.

Scientists have also completely rejected the claims. Until fire and rescue services could extinguish the flames, both the tower and the control panels were destroyed.

The BBC reported that videos purportedly showing cellphone towers on fire were posted online claiming a link between 5G technology and the COVID-19 crisis.

"Threats or violence towards any key worker or damage to mobile phone masts will not be tolerated", they added.


Other reports by iNewsToday

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