Two More Minnesotans Sickened By Tainted Romaine Lettuce

Andrew Cummings
December 7, 2019

"We're concerned this romaine may maybe be in other merchandise", acknowledged Laura Gieraltowski, lead investigator of the outbreak at the U.S. Centers for Illness Adjust and Prevention. According to CDC, there have been 102 cases reported in 23 states. Illness onset dates reported are all prior to the warning issued by the FDA on November 22, according to the report.

If it isn't labeled with a growing region, don't eat it. Throw it away.

The CDC suggests checking for a label indicating where the lettuce was grown or asking when eating at a restaurant. No common grower, supplier, distributor or brand of romaine lettuce has been identified yet.

If you don't know if the lettuce is romaine or whether a salad mix or wrap contains romaine, don't eat it. Throw it away.


"If you do not know the source of your romaine lettuce, and if you can not obtain that information from your supplier, you should not serve, ship, or sell the product", the CDC warned.

Look for a label showing where the romaine lettuce was grown. "And time and again, they've been unable to answer key questions about where and how the lettuce was contaminated, resulting in broad public warnings rather than swift, targeted recalls". If you do not know the source of your romaine lettuce, and if you can not obtain that information from your supplier, you should not serve, nor sell it. If the source of the romaine lettuce is unknown, you should not ship, nor sell the product.

Most people infected with that strain of E.coli can experience diarrhea, which is often bloody, and vomiting.

Federal officials had already asked industry to voluntarily pull all romaine from the Salinas out of the supply chain for the remainder of the growing season there. Cases that have been confirmed so far were based on illnesses reported between Sept 24 and Nov 18. There have been five outbreaks related to romaine from California and Arizona since late 2017.


FDA continues to actively investigate the cause of this outbreak.

On Thursday, the New Jersey Department of Health confirmed it was working with the CDC.

The samples and information collected during the farm investigations are now being analyzed. Additionally, state partners are testing romaine lettuce samples for E. coli that they have collected from stores and from case patients' homes. Information about our findings will be forthcoming as the investigation proceeds.

Lettuce from Salinas, Calif., may have caused the outbreak, according to the agencies.


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