Android Q Is Now Android 10, No More Dessert Names

Yolanda Curtis
August 22, 2019

You'll see these colors start to pop up on various Android-related websites Google publishes, as well as in signage and artwork Google uses at shows like MWC and CES in relation to Android.

The updated logo will be officially be used by the company for the final release of Android 10 that apparently will take place in the coming weeks. But Android Q posed a problem, because there aren't many desserts that start with Q. But instead of picking some obscure sweet thing we may not have here, it's done the boring thing instead. The move is part of an attempt to globalize the operating system's branding and make it easier for customer to understand if their phone is running the latest version.


Since L and R aren't always distinguishable when spoken in some languages, for instance, it's not immediately obvious for some people that Android Lollipop came after KitKat. Similarly, marshmallows are only popular in certain parts of the world and the word itself can be a very hard to pronounce for non-native English speakers.

At the top you'll find Android's original wordmark from 2008, in the middle is the 2014 refresh, and on the bottom is the new 2019 branding Google just announced today.


For those who have been keeping count, Android 9 Pie marked Android's 14 dessert-based official release: There was Android 1.0 that was never really released to the public. The font is a bit lighter (with a new lower-left radial curve), the logo is now officially black, and the bugdroid head will be featured more prominently with the logo going forward.

As a brand, Android is getting new logos and colors. We have seen some exciting names from Google for Android such as Cupcake, Lollipop or Pie. Still, Google says it's an important one because it found that the green text in the old logo could be hard to read in some scenarios, so this new color scheme will help improve contrast. Perhaps the biggest component of this brand shake up is a change in the way Google names Android releases.


This story is developing.

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