Turkey receives first delivery of Russian S-400 missile system: Ankara

Cheryl Sanders
July 12, 2019

The first shipment of Russian S-400 surface-to-air missile system has arrived in Turkey, the Turkish Defence Ministry said Friday.

On Wednesday Turkey called on the United States to avoid steps harmful to bilateral relations after the US State Department spokeswoman reiterated Ankara would face "real and negative consequences" for acquiring Russian S-400 defense systems.

Russia's Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation confirmed it had started delivering the S-400 to Turkey and that the deliveries would continue as per an agreed schedule, the RIA news agency reported.

The first components for the system arrived at an air base in Ankara, the Turkish capital, on Friday, the defense ministry said in a statement.


After meeting President Donald Trump at a G20 summit last month, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said the United States did not plan to impose sanctions on Ankara for buying the S-400s.

Although expressed sympathy toward Turkey's decision to purchase the Russian system during a meeting with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on the sidelines of a meeting in Japan, Washington has repeatedly said that the Russian system is incompatible with North Atlantic Treaty Organisation systems and is a threat to the F-35.

Investors in Turkey have been concerned about the impact of potential US sanctions on an economy which fell into recession after a currency crisis previous year. Washington has stated that it will exclude Ankara from the F-35 program if Turkey buys the S-400 systems.

Trump sounded convinced and said: "You can't do business that way".


India has also chose to augment its air defence with the Russian S-400 Triumf missile system, sealing the deal in October 2018.

Investors in Turkey have been concerned about the impact of potential USA sanctions on an economy which fell into recession after a currency crisis a year ago.

Turkey has refused to bow to U.S. pressure, insisting that choosing which defence equipment to purchase is a matter of national sovereignty.

Turkey says the system is a strategic defence requirement, particularly to secure its southern borders with Syria and Iraq.


Erdogan has dismissed that possibility, but Washington has already started the process of removing Turkey from the programme, halting training of Turkish pilots in the United States on the aircraft. The S-400 system can engage targets at a distance of 400 km and at an altitude of up to 35 km.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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