Steven Spielberg penning horror series for Quibi

Carla Harmon
June 11, 2019

It's been a while since Steven Spielberg scripted a scary story, but chances are, audiences of his original Poltergeist movie still get shivers when his creepiest scenes sneak back into their memories. According to Variety, Spielberg has already written several episodes for a new horror series, which will be split up into "chapters" rather than episodes. Today we have word that the big man himself will be writing a new horror series, which is being developed for Quibi under the title Spielberg's After Dark. Katzenberg said that the award-winning director wants the viewers to only be able to watch the horror series after midnight.

Having Spielberg write, but not direct, a series is an interesting development.


The revelation came as Jeffrey Katzenberg, fresh from a spot at the Produced By conference, took his Quibi roadshow north of the border with an appearance at the Banff World Media Festival. "Getting him to write something is fantastic", Katzenberg said. He said that his business partner Meg Whitman came up with an idea - tagged as Spielberg's After Dark presentation - to put a clock within the Quibi player to mean that viewers will only have a limited amount of time to watch the show.

A clock will appear on the phones, ticking down until the sunset, wherever the user is, until it is completely gone. Episodes will become available after dark and disappear as soon as the sun comes up, until the next night.


Details of Quibi were released over the weekend by founder Jeffery Katzenberg. It'll feature short episodes, called chapters, that will range between 7 and 10 minutes in length.

Few people could walk into a brand new company and say "I have an idea for you, but the technology has to be invented for it". Quibi will launch in the spring of 2020 with tiered pricing depending on whether or not you want to watch ads before the content.


Quibi has already unveiled a number of high-profile content, including #Freerayshawn starring Stephen James and Laurence Fishburne. The project will be two-and-a-half hours long and broken into 15 chapters ranging from seven to 10 minutes.

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