Saudi crown prince had threatened to use 'bullet' on Khashoggi: NYTimes

Cheryl Sanders
February 8, 2019

The New York Times, citing officials who had seen USA intelligence, said that Prince Mohammed had warned in an intercepted conversation to an aide in 2017 that he would go after Khashoggi "with a bullet" if he did not return to Saudi Arabia from the United States.

The Washington Post, for which Khashoggi had been a columnist, reported on October 10 that Mohammed had personally ordered an effort to lure the journalist back to Saudi Arabia.

However, Callamard said Turkish attempts to promptly investigate Khashoggi's killing were thwarted by Saudi Arabia, which provided "woefully inadequate time and access" to the crime scene.

Ms. Callamard said her team had access to part of "chilling and gruesome audio material" of Mr. Khashoggi's death obtained by the Turkish intelligence agency.

Ms Callamard is due to submit her final report in June to the UN Human Rights Council, including recommendations on formal criminal accountability.


USA intelligence agencies believe Crown Prince Mohammed ordered an operation to kill Mr. Khashoggi, a critic and Washington Post columnist, and say his body was dismembered and removed to a location still publicly unknown.

The UN official's announcement comes a day after the Saudi government contested a key element of a Central Intelligence Agency assessment that concluded that Prince Salman likely ordered the murder.

The kingdom, after initially denying any knowledge of Khashoggi's disappearance, has acknowledged that a team killed him inside the embassy but described it as a rogue operation that did not involve the crown prince.

U.S. intelligence agencies believe Crown Prince Mohammed ordered an operation to kill Khashoggi, and say his body was dismembered and removed to a location still publicly unknown. His body has yet to be found.

Callamard said her team were unable to perform a "thorough review" of this material and she did not have the chance to authenticate the recording independently.


"It has become a one-man rule", Khashoggi told FRANCE 24 in an interview past year.

A United Nations -led inquiry into the Khashoggi killing said on Thursday that evidence pointed to a brutal crime "planned and perpetrated" by Saudi officials.

The prosecutor said earlier this month his office was seeking the death penalty for five of the 11 indicted suspects.

"It is also raising a number of global implications which demand the urgent attention of the worldwide community, including the United Nations".

Khashoggi was strangled before being chopped into pieces by a hit team of 15 Saudis sent to Istanbul for the killing, according to Turkish officials, with local reports suggesting his remains were dissolved in acid.


The intelligence reports offer some of the most direct evidence of the role the crown prince may have played in Khashoggi's slaying, which sparked weeks of worldwide outrage and protest.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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