Kyler Murray Is Now Fully Committed To Playing NFL Football

Ross Houston
February 11, 2019

"Moving forward, I am firmly and fully committing my life and time to becoming an National Football League quarterback", the 21-year-old wrote.

While it certainly seemed to be headed this way for a while now, dynamic-if-undersized Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray, who had been a first-round draft pick of baseball's Oakland A's (and received a $4 million bonus for it, which he will basically give up), has officially chosen to forego baseball for now and put all his time and effort into playing in the NFL.

"Football has been my love and passion my entire life", Murray said in Monday's statement.


"He's really fun to watch on a football field, and he's going to be fun to watch on a baseball field".

At the end of the day, the money was on the NFL's side. But that narrative has changed (albeit pre-Scouting combine) and most think Murray will indeed be a first-round pick.

Although he kept his decision under wraps until the week he was due to report in Arizona, Murray said his work toward making an impression ahead of the 2019 NFL Draft already has begun.


Before Murray announced his decision Billy Beane, Oakland's executive vice president of baseball operations, acknowledged his team might lose the player. That, too, is according to the league's design-one that artificially suppresses salaries for young players through the arbitration system and keeps them from unfettered free agency for half a decade (where the owners have now also chose to keep their checkbooks closed, too).

Oakland A's draft pick and Oklahoma QB prospect Kyler Murray announced Monday he will commit to a football career in preparation for the 2019 NFL Draft.

Although NFL talent evaluators gravitate toward taller quarterbacks, the success of stars such as Russell Wilson (at 5-11) and Baker Mayfield (generously listed at 6-1) have caused some NFL scouts to reconsider that preference. You can't blame the league for that, but it does represent how precarious baseball's position on the media map is, as MLB fights the NFL and National Basketball Association for the eyeballs and dollars of fans. Although the A's were hoping he'd choose baseball, they were increasingly pessimistic the longer his locker in their spring-training clubhouse sat empty. Professional football is no cakewalk itself, but it does offer a better landing spot for his particular skills as a highly mobile and strong-armed passer in a league where that's now all the rage.


Part of that is because they have been linked to Murray in the pre-draft process.

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