China strongly dissatisfied by USA warships entering South China Sea

Cheryl Sanders
February 12, 2019

If the sides can not reach an agreement by March 1, when a 90-day tariffs truce ends, the Trump administration has said it will raise tariffs on US$200 billion of Chinese goods from 10 per cent to 25 per cent.

The operation was the second in the South China Sea reported by the US Navy this year.

China struck an upbeat note on Monday as trade talks resumed with the United States, but also expressed anger at a U.S. Navy mission through the disputed South China Sea, casting a shadow over the prospect for improved Beijing-Washington ties.

Officials including U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are in Beijing for another round of talks with Chinese officials including Vice Premier Liu He.


The US is "determined to stir up trouble in the South China Sea, create tension and undermine peace", Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a press briefing.

Navy spokesman Commander Clay Doss told USA media: "All operations are designed in accordance with global law and demonstrate that the United States will fly, sail and operate wherever worldwide law allows".

"All operations are designed in accordance with worldwide law and demonstrate that the United States will fly, sail and operate wherever global law allows".

China has laid claim to most of the South China Sea, which is used by several countries, including the USA, as an important shipping lane.


The US labelled the Chinese warship's actions unsafe and unprofessional, while Beijing said the US was threatening the safety and sovereignty of China. The deployment is seen as the latest attempt by Washington to stand up to what it believes are attempts by Beijing to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese and other Southeast Asian navies operate. In January, the destroyer USS McCampbell sailed within 12 nautical miles of the Paracel Islands.

The Navy sent USS Preble, left, and USS Spruance, right, near the Chinese manmade island of Mischief Reef in the South China Sea, the location of several territorial conflicts that have raised tensions in the region.

China defends its construction as necessary for self-defence and says it is the United States that is responsible for ratcheting up tensions in the region by sending warships and military planes close to islands Beijing claims.

"There's been sort of a steady increase", Admiral John Richardson, the US Chief of Naval Operations, told reporters earlier this month when asked about China's militarization of the area.


China claims almost all of the South China Sea, though Taiwan, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam all claim parts of it.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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