The crew of "Soyuz MS-11" went to the ISS

Pablo Tucker
December 7, 2018

Astronauts Anne McClain from American space agency Nasa, David Saint-Jacques from the Canadian Space Agency and Oleg Kononenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos left aboard the Russian Soyuz spacecraft from Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan just after 11.31am GMT.

Saint-Jacques will be the first Canadian astronaut to visit the space station since Chris Hadfield, who recorded a version of David Bowie's "Space Oddity" on board in 2013. In addition, Kononenko and Prokopiev 11 December will be released into outer space to explore the ship "Soyuz MS-09" where you previously found the hole.

Russian Federation said last month the launch failed because of a sensor that was damaged during assembly at the Baikonur cosmodrome but insisted the spacecraft remained reliable.


Canadian Space Agency president Sylvain Laporte told the crew members there was "a lot of relief" when the astronauts entered the space station about two hours after docking.

In October, booster failure forced a Soyuz spacecraft carrying Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and U.S. astronaut Nick Hague to make an emergency landing.

The arrival briefly restores the station's crew complement to six as they join Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) and Sergey Prokopyev of the Russian space agency Roscosmos. "They share some of the same problems we do - there's a finite amount in the budget in our countries and space flight is part of the discretionary budget", shared NASA Associate Administrator William Gerstenmaier to Bloomberg. After the failed October launch, the astronauts "returned to Earth safe and sound". They managed to emerge safely despite a harrowing descent back to Earth.


The families of the crew, other astronauts and space officials from several nations breathed a sigh of relief after observing the flawless launch, with October's Soyuz rocket failure still on the minds of many. Since the October mishap, four successful unmanned Soyuz satellite launches have been conducted to clear the path for the crew's launch on Monday.

This failure caused the automatic ejection of the part where the capsule was with the 2 men, who were able to return safely to the ground.

Saint-Jacques has spent years training for the six-month mission, which was originally scheduled for December 20 but was moved up after the aborted Soyuz launch.


Other reports by iNewsToday

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER