Khashoggi murder: Central Intelligence Agency chief Haspel 'to brief Congress'

Cheryl Sanders
December 4, 2018

Haspel is set to meet Republican and Democratic Senate leaders on Tuesday, as well as the chairmen and ranking senators on the key national security committees. They are also supporting legislation to end US support for the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen, which the Trump administration opposes. Rand Paul believes Haspel should share the CIA's findings with all members of Congress.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis led the earlier briefing and tried to dissuade senators from punishing Saudi Arabia with a resolution to curtail USA backing for the Saudi-led war in Yemen. Haspel was conspicuously absent from last week's briefing on the matter to the entire Senate, and today, Paul said that intelligence officials withholding information from Congress is "the very definition of the deep state".

Sen. Bob Corker says a jury would find the Saudi crown prince 'in about 30 minutes.'
Sen. Bob Corker says a jury would find the Saudi crown prince 'in about 30 minutes.'

A Saudi government critic who was living in self-imposed exile in the US, Khashoggi was killed inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on 2 October. Trump has touted Saudi arms deals worth billions of dollars to the USA and recently thanked Saudi Arabia for plunging oil prices.

The Wall Street Journal first reported that Haspel would conduct a briefing.


The senators were not allow to disclose details of what they were told, but their reaction reinforced reports that the Central Intelligence Agency had accumulated substantial evidence that the crown prince was behind the murder.

Paul said if he was allowed into the secure room for the briefing, he'd ask Haspel - a Kentucky native - several other questions, including whether there were text messages sent from the killers to the crown prince's office. "After all, someone's got to do it".


At last week's briefing, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said there was no hard evidence the crown prince was behind the killing and urged senators not to downgrade ties with Saudi Arabia over the incident.

Even if the Yemen resolution passes the Senate, it appears unlikely to advance in the House.


Other reports by iNewsToday

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