Soyuz Crew Performs Ballistic Reentry After Booster Fails During Launch

Pablo Tucker
October 12, 2018

"The Soyuz capsule returned to Earth via a ballistic descent, which is a sharper angle of landing compared to normal", NASA said on its website.

In Thursday's emergency, Hague and Ovchinin experienced G-forces six to seven times Earth's gravity, Reid Wiseman, NASA's deputy chief astronaut, told reporters Thursday at a press briefing.

American astronaut Nick Hague (right) and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin speak before taking off aboard a Soyuz MS-10 capsule to the International Space Station, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, on October 11, 2018.

Since the retirement of the space shuttle in 2011, the US has been relying on Russian Soyuz rockets, launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, to get astronauts to the Space Station.


A search-and-rescue team has reached the landing site, both crewmembers are in good condition and have left the Soyuz capsule as of 6:10 a.m. EDT, NASA spokesperson Brandi Dean said during live television commentary. The city is about 450 kilometers from the Russia's Baikonur space center, which Russian Federation operates through an agreement with the Republic of Kazakhstan. Dzhezkazgan is about 450 kilometres northeast of Baikonur.

That's according to Dmitry Rogozin, the head of Russian space agency Roscosmos.

Russian activities in Ukraine, charges of interfering in the USA presidential election of 2016 and the conflict in Syria are some of the main issues. Industry experts say the country's space industry has suffered so many mishaps that a serious accident during a manned mission was simply a matter of time. They will be transported to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia outside of Moscow.

September 27, 1983: A Soyuz rocket that was to carry Vladimir Titov and Gennady Strekalov to a Salyut space station caught fire in the final seconds of the countdown at Baikonur. Last year, NASA astronaut Jack Fischer and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin shared a ride to ISS.


The rocket had lifted off at 4:40 a.m. ET on a journey that was expected to involve four orbits of the Earth and take six hours.

While Russian rockets had earned a stellar reputation for their reliability in the past, a string of failed launches in recent years has called into doubt Russia's ability to maintain the same high standards of manufacturing.

Glitches found in Russia's Proton and Soyuz rockets in 2016 were traced to manufacturing flaws at the plant in Voronezh.

There have been only two similar aborted manned space launches in the history of the Soviet space programme.


Rogozin has complained of problems with NASA and has suggested that a hole on the ISS could be the result of sabotage. NASA also said in a statement that "NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and the NASA team are monitoring the situation carefully", and that a "thorough investigation" will be conducted.

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