Second Sergei Skripal 'poisoner' identified as Russian military doctor

Cheryl Sanders
October 9, 2018

British officials said when they brought charges in the March nerve agent attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter that they believed Petrov was an assumed name.

"While Alexander Mishkin's true persona has an even sparser digital footprint than Anatoliy Chepiga's, Bellingcat has been able to establish certain key facts from his background", Bellingcat said.

Dr Alexander Mishkin goes by the alias "Alexander Petrov".

Researchers from investigative collective Bellingcat claim they have identified the second suspect involved in the Skripal poisoning case.

"Based on the body of intelligence, the government has concluded that the two individuals named by the police and the Crown Prosecution Service are officers from the Russian military intelligence service, also known as the GRU", British Prime Minister Theresa May told parliament at the time.


Mishkin trained as a military doctor before joining the GRU, moving to Moscow in 2010, and being assigned the undercover identity of Alexander Petrov, Bellingcat says, citing both public documents and unnamed sources.

Bellingcat's latest investigation said Mishkin was born in 1979 in the Archangelsk District in northern Russia and graduated from the elite Military Medical Academies, where he was trained for medical work in the Russian navy.

In July, UK woman Dawn Sturgess died from what British police say was contact with the poison which her partner found in a discarded perfume bottle.

Britain last month charged two Russian men with the poisoning.

The second suspect in the attempted poisoning of a former Russian secret agent has been identified by an investigative website.


They were found unconscious on a bench outside the Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury.

Both suspects appeared on Russian state TV last month, proclaiming their innocence.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, whose government has long denied having any knowledge of the attack, initially claimed that the two men's names "mean nothing to us", then said that they were civilians.

The US Justice Department also charged seven GRU officers in an alleged global hacking rampage that targeted more than 250 athletes, a Pennsylvania-based nuclear energy company, a Swiss chemical laboratory and the chemical weapons watchdog.


Other reports by iNewsToday

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER