Intel's New 9th-Gen Core Lineup Boasts 5GHz Clock Speeds

Yolanda Curtis
October 9, 2018

Intel also learned from some of its earlier mistakes and has chose to use soldered thermal interface material (STIM) on these three 9th generation Core CPUs, which should provide increased thermal conductivity between the CPU and the IHS, provide better heat dissipation, and make the de-lidding unnecessary.

Meanwhile, Intel's 14nm has reportedly become the most profitable line of hardware the company has ever manufactured, though that's likely in part due to the necessity of using it as long as Intel has.

Intel's pricing for trays of 1,000 CPUs comes in at $488 for the Core i9-9900K, $374 for the Core i7-9700K, and $262 for the Core i5-8600K.

The company might update to the new 10nm manufacturing process standard next year with its highly anticipated Cannon Lake chips. It has a base clock speed limit of 3.6GHz and can be boosted up to a maximum of 4.9GHz. The Core i7 model interestingly has eight cores, compared to six with the Core i7-8700K, but this model lacks Hyper-Threading which means that the total thread count has actually declined from 12 to eight. B&H Photo, for example, has the Core i9-9900K listed at $529.99, the Core i7-9700K at $399, and the Core i5-9600K at $279.99.


The Intel Core i9 9900K processor is aimed at desktop-based enthusiasts and Intel is claiming that this is the "the best gaming processor in the world".

Intel says the new Core i9-9900K processor is created to deliver the best gaming performance in the world. Similarly, video editing with Adobe Premiere is up to 34 percent and 97 percent faster respectively, as per Intel's own testing. However, if production is more your thing, then you'll want to take a look at the Core-X series instead. There's also a 16MB cache and dual-channel DDR4 RAM support.

Core i9-9980XE: 18C/36T, 3.0/4.4GHz base/boost, 165W TDP, $1,979 MSRP.

All of these new 9th Gen processors have hardware mitigation against Meltdown Variant 3, the security bug that we heard so much about back in January. Here's everything you need to know.


Intel will also sell even more powerful Core X (for "extreme") CPUs-which are really Skylake-era designs-with many more cores starting in November. And new Xeon workstation parts-with up to 28 cores and 56 threads-will debut in December.

For its latest 9th Generation chips Intel is going with a soldered integrated heat spreader (IHS) - which we haven't seen since Sandy Bridge - to support greater overclocking capabilities.

That's because Intel's truly new chips have been significantly delayed.

Whether or not Intel's 9th-gen speedup matters to you depends on how recently you've upgraded your current PC.


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