Don't drink and fly: 'Tipsy' birds cause havoc and crash into windows

Henrietta Brewer
October 6, 2018

The police department explained that due to an early frost, certain berries in the community have started the fermenting process early.

Many birds have not yet migrated south, and those still in town have been eating the berries up and, according to police, getting "a little more "tipsy" than normal'".

"Police added", Generally, younger bird's liver can't handle the toxins as efficiently as more mature birds.

The police force is asking, however, that residents watch out for "any other birds after midnight with Taco Bell items", or "Angry Birds laughing and giggling uncontrollably and appearing to be happy".


Police in a small northern Minnesota community have been taking some odd calls about birds that seem to be intoxicated. The answer was bizarrely familiar: the birds were flying under the influence.

Image: The birds are said to be "confused".

It got so bad in the Yukon city of Whitehorse in 2014 that the government's Animal Health Unit set up "drunk tanks" (modified hamster cages) for some Bohemian waxwings that needed to be cut off from the fermented berries of the rowan tree, National Geographic reports.

"Oh my! That explains all the birds bouncing off my window lately", said one resident.


It's not an isolated incident.

"Drunk birds are totally a thing", Stiteler said.

This apparently isn't the first time that Minnesota residents have had run-ins with drunk birds, but this year's early frost and the habit of the birds sticking around later into fall and winter have resulted in a lot of fermented berries being consumed by unwitting avians.

Others reported handfuls of birds flying into their cars and dead birds in their lawns.


As Dodder told The Post, "Sometimes, they just need a bit of time in a quiet setting to recover". The birds then slam into buildings, vehicles, or just act freaky for a while before they eventually snap out of it, just like your average bar fly.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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