Democrats to force health care vote Wednesday in the Senate

Henrietta Brewer
October 10, 2018

Kavanaugh is accompanied by his wife Ashley Kavanaugh, third from left, and children Margaret, second from left, and Liza.

His ascent to the court was sealed by a 50-48 Senate vote on Saturday.

And on Monday evening he was the guest of honour at a ceremonial swearing-in at the White House.

Before the arguments began, Chief Justice John Roberts welcomed Kavanaugh, 53, to a court that now has five conservative members and four liberals.

"What happened to the Kavanaugh family violates every notion of fairness, decency and due process", the president said in his remarks at the swearing in.


"If I'm chairman, they won't take it up", Grassley said, referring to a possible 2020 nomination in a Tuesday interview with Fox News.

"The Democrats are even talking about doing really bad things now to Justice Kavanaugh", said Trump. Before Kavanaugh got a seat on the court, several polls were finding the opposite.

He said that "under historic scrutiny", Mr Kavanaugh was "proven innocent".

Asked by a reporter about the possibility that Democrats could "launch many, many investigations into the President and the administration", McConnell said, "I think it will help the president get re-elected".

"This will be the first time a Supreme Court Justice has ever sworn in a former clerk to take his seat - a lovely moment which reminds us that freedom is a tradition passed down from generation to generation", Trump said. At the time, McConnell said that he was blocking Garland because voters "should have a say in the court's direction" on Election Day. Meanwhile, Democrats are still bitter about Kavanaugh's confirmation.


He told an audience that included the entire Supreme Court and a Who´s Who of Republican movers and shakers that he had "no bitterness" and would never bring politics into the top court. "No one who felt the force of that anger could possibly believe that Kavanaugh might actually be a detached and impartial judge". It comes just in time to motivate evangelicals and social conservatives to turn out to vote in November elections that will determine control of Congress.

Fifty-six percent are angry about how the Senate treated Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, including 35 percent who are very angry, Rasmussen said. He denied the allegations.

And yet, it's quite plausible that installing a historically unpopular Supreme Court justice - whom most Americans regard as a sex offender - was, nonetheless, a political win for the GOP.

Kavanaugh replaces Kennedy, a conservative jurist who often cast the deciding swing vote on ideologically divisive issues, upholding abortion and gay rights and the use of affirmative action aiding racial minorities in college admissions.

Likewise, strong supporters of President Donald Trump were the most likely to express concern over false allegations.


Between Thursday and Saturday of last week, the Capitol Police arrested more than 544 protesters related to the Kavanaugh nomination.

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