Brett Kavanaugh: 2 New Women Are Coming Forward With Sexual Misconduct Allegations

Cheryl Sanders
September 24, 2018

The woman accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of a decades-old sexual assault has accepted a Senate committee's request to tell her side next week but Christine Blasey Ford wants to resume negotiations over the exact terms of her appearance, her lawyers said Saturday.

Ronan Farrow and Jane Mayer of The New Yorker reported Sunday that Deborah Ramirez, 53, attended Yale with Kavanaugh and said she remembers Kavanaugh exposing himself to her at a dormitory party.

"This alleged event from 35 years ago did not happen", he said.

"This 35-year-old, uncorroborated claim is the latest in a coordinated smear campaign by the Democrats, created to tear down a good man", White House Spokesperson Kerri Kupec said.

"As with any witness who comes before the Senate, the Senate Judiciary Committee can not hand over its constitutional duties to attorneys for outside witnesses", Mike Davis, Senator Grassley's top nominations counsel, wrote in an email exchange with Ms Ford's lawyers obtained by the Associated Press.

She was in possession of a letter that accused Judge Brett Kavanaugh of a sexual assault back when he was in high school.

On top of these new allegations, Stormy Daniels' lawyer Michael Avenatti has said that he represents a woman who also claims knowledge of sexual misconduct. Grassley, R-Iowa, had set a possible Monday vote to decide whether to recommend Kavanaugh's nomination to the full Senate.


"The committee's majority staff learned the allegations made by Deborah Ramirez about Judge Kavanaugh from this evening's New Yorker report", said Taylor Foy, a communications director for Grassley.

As he builds a case for his innocence, Mr Kavanaugh plans to turn over to the committee calendars from the summer of 1982 that don't show a party consistent with Ms Ford's description of the gathering in which she says he attacked her, The New York Times reported. But after consultation with a lawyer, Ramirez told the magazine she felt confident enough in her recollection that it happened.

One classmate who Ramirez said egged on Kavanaugh denied any memory of the party, according to the magazine.

Ford says an inebriated Kavanaugh pinned her on a bed, muffled her cries and tried removing her clothes when both were teenagers in the 1980s.

Blasey Ford's story is by now familiar to anyone who's tuned in to a USA news channel in the past week: she alleges that a drunken Kavanaugh steered her into a bedroom and tried to undress her during a gathering of teens in suburban Maryland in the 1980s.

Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University, has said she didn't tell anyone about the alleged attack at the time, in part because she didn't want to tell her parents about underage drinking at a party where she said it occurred. California's Diane Feinstein, the committee's top Democrat, sent a letter Sunday to Republican chairman Charles Grassley urging him to refer the new allegations to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in order to ensure "a fair, independent process that will gather all the facts". "This is another serious, credible, and disturbing allegation against Brett Kavanaugh".

There are still unresolved procedural and logistical issues regarding Ford's testimony, her lawyers said, including whether the Judiciary Committee's Republican senators, who are all male, or staff attorneys would question her. Ford's lawyers said "various senators have been dismissive of her account and should have to shoulder their responsibility to ask her questions".


The White House's statement was similar in its wording.

She told the magazine that she pushed the person away.

"I did not ask to be involved in this matter nor did anyone asked me to be involved", Judge said in a written statement forwarded to the committee by his attorney. "She has agreed to move forward with a hearing even though the committee has refused to subpoena Mark Judge".

Keyser, according to Walsh, believes Ford's allegations against Kavanaugh.

The two parties will testify separately - first Ford, followed by Kavanaugh's response - the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmed.

At stake is not only the fate of Trump's hand-picked Supreme Court nominee, but also Republican chances in November's midterm elections that face increased risk if the polarizing confirmation battle drags on.

Kavanaugh is President Trump's choice to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.


Other reports by iNewsToday

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