Bill Cosby Might Be In Prison On Monday

Carla Harmon
September 24, 2018

Bill Cosby, the comedian once known as "America's Dad", could be sentenced to life in prison this week after his conviction for sexual assault.

The movement itself may have helped convict Cosby, after his first trial in mid-2017 for sexually assaulting a former friend, Andrea Constand, ended with a hung jury.

The final decision rests with Judge Steven O'Neill, who will impose the sentence after a hearing that could stretch across two days in Norristown, a down-at-heel town just outside Philadelphia.

The judge allowed prosecutors to call five other accusers as witnesses in Cosby's second trial over the objections of his defense team, bolstering Constand's account.


Following the popularity of the video, women came out of the woodwork to accuse Mr. Cosby of many crimes, ranging from sexual harassment, assault, all the way to drugging and raping.

Bill Cosby, 81, was convicted on three counts of aggravated indecent assault in April for drugging and molesting Temple University staffer Andrea Constand in 2004.

If the sentencing exceeds two years then Cosby will have to go to state prison, Valentino said the women would feel validated and vindicated to see him walk out of the courtroom in handcuffs. State guidelines suggest a one- to four-year sentence.

On Thursday, Montgomery County Judge Stephen O'Neill denied a prosecution request to allow other accusers to testify as evidence of Cosby's alleged "uncharged criminal acts".


Two of those women, Lise-Lotte Lublin and Chelan Lasha, said Sunday at a Philadelphia news conference that they want prison for him and hope they get to make impact statements at the sentencing.

"[The movement] may have influenced the judge's willingness to allow more witnesses", Orenstein said.

Lublin said she thinks "it's important that he spend some time behind bars".

Cosby plans to appeal against the conviction, and his lawyers will probably argue for leniency considering his age and frail health.


The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Lublin and Lasha have done.

Other reports by iNewsToday

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER