May clings to power amid Brexit resignation turmoil

Cheryl Sanders
July 10, 2018

May said she had chaired a "productive" meeting of her government, unswayed by the resignations of Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and Brexit negotiator David Davis that rocked the government on Monday.

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves Downing Street in London, Britain, July 10, 2018.

But within 48 hours Davis had quit, saying she had already given too much away to the European Union, and Johnson followed.

"That dream is dying, suffocated by needless self-doubt". May appointed staunchly pro-Brexit lawmaker Dominic Raab to replace Davis, who insisted he did not want his resignation to become a rallying cry for the prime minister's ouster.

Addressing policy makers at the Council on Foreign Relations, Mr Barnier warned Britain no deal with the European Union would ever replicate membership to the bloc.

But former Conservative leader William Hague, writing in the Daily Telegraph, said May´s critics had failed to produce "any credible alternative proposal" and warned that further resignations could put Brexit itself "at risk".


It said May now faces "the spectre of a leadership challenge", but it was "possible that after a period of resignations and political blood-letting, the Conservative Party will fall behind the prime minister".

The crisis swirling around the United Kingdom government and Brexit talks right now has been touted by some factions as a result of prime minister Theresa May's weak leadership.

Raab, who is promoted from housing minister, now faces the hard task of calming nervous Brexiteers within the Tory ranks who are threatening to derail Theresa May's plans.

"Nine ministers have now resigned from the two key Brexit departments since Article 50 was triggered".

Britain and the European Union hope to reach broad agreement by October so the national parliaments of the remaining countries can ratify a deal before Britain leaves.

The broadsheet version of Die Welt says the government is "wobbling" after the departure of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary.


Johnson reportedly was more blunt, describing the plan as a "turd".

Mr Johnson and Mr Davis could be the front-runners in the event of a no-confidence vote, although other figures may launch bids of their own.

Mrs May is expected to use a Commons statement to tell MPs that the strategy agreed on at Chequers is the "right Brexit" for Britain.

He added that he would not run for the leadership of the Conservative Party in the future.

Opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn said the government was incapable of delivering Brexit.

"Brexit should be about opportunity and hope".


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