British man injured in Amesbury incident regains consciousness

Cheryl Sanders
July 11, 2018

Charlie Rowley, 45, was poisoned along with Dawn Sturgess, who died on Sunday, by the same nerve agent used in the attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in March.

In response, the official Twitter account for Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs called Williamson's statements the latest attempt to unfairly blame Russian Federation for poisonings related to Novichok. "Could you perhaps come up with something new?"

The BBC understands the white Audi belonged to a paramedic who had been with Ms Sturgess in an ambulance when she fell ill.

"That is something that I think the world will unite with us in actually condemning".

Lorna Wilkinson, director of nursing at the hospital, said: "While this is welcome news, we are not out of the woods yet".


But he said he found it highly unlikely there was not a link to the attack, which the United Kingdom blames on Russian Federation.

British police said that novichok, the powerful nerve agent that killed one person and left another critically ill in southwestern England, could be active for up to 50 years if it remains in a container.

Reuters contributed reporting to this article.

Tributes have been paid to mother-of-three Ms Sturgess, with her family saying: 'Dawn's death has been devastating for us.

Yulia Skripal, Sergei's daughter, was in a coma for 20 days after she was attacked and was eventually discharged about five weeks after the poisoning.


Sally Davies, Britan's chief medical adviser, also said the threat to the public is low but reinforced warnings to residents of Salisbury and Amesbury against touching stray containers, syringes, needles, cosmetics or similar objects. "Charlie [Rowley] is still very unwell and will continue to require specialist, round-the-clock care".

It was feared it might have been contaminated and was taken to the Government laboratory at Porton Down, near Salisbury, to be destroyed.

Wiltshire Police said the public "should not be alarmed by this", adding: "Those involved have the training and expertise to safely remove the vehicle". Police believe they touched a contaminated item that has not been found.

A team wearing protective clothing is combing the small flat, working in 30-minute shifts because of the heat.


Other reports by iNewsToday

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