World Cup 2026 awarded to USA, Canada and Mexico


World Cup 2026 awarded to USA, Canada and Mexico

Ross Houston
June 13, 2018

Members of worldwide soccer body Federation Internationale de Football Association voted 134-65 on Wednesday in favor of a joint North American bid put forward by the three countries over a rival bid by Morocco.

Of the 16 host cities, 10 will be in the United States while the remainder will be split evenly between Canada and Mexico.

Morocco has now lost five bid campaigns.

On Wednesday morning in Moscow, Russia, the 68th FIFA Congress awarded the 2026 FIFA World Cup to the United North American bid, submitted by Canada, the United States and Mexico.


Historically, the host nation has always automatically qualified for the World Cup - it hasn't been forced to play games in order to qualify for the tournament.

The FIFA Congress held its annual meeting the day before the start of the World Cup to vote on whether the USA -led bid or the Morocco bid will get to host the soccer tournament. However, the spending tally provided by Russia's World Cup organizers falls short of the amount spent by Brazil to host the 2014 World Cup.

Iceland and Panama are World Cup debutants, Peru are back for the first time since 1982, and Egypt end an absence dating to 1990.

Canada failed in its lone previous bid - to host the 1986 tournament after Colombia pulled out as host.


Qatar, who will host in 4 years' time, will mark the first time the tournament is played during winter months because of the nation's high temperatures during summertime.

The 80 matches in the 2026 tournament, involving an expanded roster of 48 teams, will be held in stadiums scattered throughout the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

In 2010, the US was a finalist to host the 2020 World Cup but lost to Qatar in a vote that was later discredited - but not reversed - because of widespread corruption in FIFA's ranks.

However, any positive impact on the Russian economy from the World Cup is likely to be short-lived, according to credit rating agency Moody's, which analyzes the event's influence every four years.


Edmontonian Alphonso Davies, 17, was the first to speak in the United Bid's final presentation to the FIFA Congress prior to the vote. It's not clear how that would work with three countries as co-hosts.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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