Lee resigns United Kingdom justice ministry role in Brexit protest

Cheryl Sanders
June 12, 2018

The government is attempting to reverse a series of amendments made to the European Union withdrawal bill by the House of Lords.

In his speech, Lee slammed the government for fighting a crucial amendment, which will be voted Tuesday afternoon, created to give MPs the power to send the government back to Brussels to renegotiate the terms of Britain's departure should the House of Commons reject the final Brexit deal.

Among the 14 amendments to the Bill - set to be voted on by MPs on Tuesday and Wednesday - are changes which would see the United Kingdom stay in the Single Market and would allow Parliament to dictate future negotiating terms.

Theresa May has told anti-Brexit Conservative MPs that they will undermine her negotiations with the European Union if they rebel on a series of crucial votes in the Commons over the next two days.


Prime Minister Theresa May could face a possible backbench revolt and she has urged potential Conservative rebels to support the government.

On Tuesday, parliament will also debate other amendments, including a challenge to the government's plan to put March 29, 2019, or "Brexit Day", into law and an attempt to toughen a commitment to ensure a frictionless border between Northern Ireland and the neighboring Irish Republic, which will remain in the EU.

Lee, who was Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Ministry of Justice, has quit the front bench so he can vote against the government on the "meaningful vote" amendment.

The MP says he will back a knife edge vote created to give parliament the power to vote down May's Brexit deal.


"But the message we send to the country through our votes this week is important".

The speech will come on the eve of two days of debates and voting on amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill, which is scheduled to last 12 hours.

It is expected that Tuesday will see MPs decide whether Parliament should have the power to set the Government's negotiating goals if Theresa May's deal with Brussels is voted down.

"The main reason for my taking this decision now is the Brexit process and the Government's wish to limit Parliament's role in contributing to the final outcome in a vote that takes place today", he said.


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