Subtropical Storm Alberto heads to the US Gulf

Pablo Tucker
May 28, 2018

Subtropical Storm Alberto is expected to hit the United States northern Gulf Coast on Monday, the National Weather Service has declared.

A storm surge watch is in effect along the US gulf coast, from Crystal River to the mouth of the Mississippi River.

In Mississippi, Gov. Phil Bryant activated the National Guard.

Subtropical Storm Alberto heads to the US Gulf

Subtropical Storm Alberto was moving northward through the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday.

Alberto may strengthen slightly in the next several hours, but it looks like it has run out of time to transition to a fully tropical storm before it makes landfall around noon Monday on the Florida panhandle. "We're talking eight to 12 inches of rain this weekend, and storm surges on the Gulf Coast".

Florida, Alabama and MS declared states of emergency on Saturday as the storm threatened up to 12 inches of rain over the Memorial Day weekend, as well as tidal surges and damaging winds, according to Patrick Burke of the weather service's Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland. The tropical storm watch along the north-central Gulf Coast has been discontinued.


The new forecast track centers landfall in the Florida panhandle.

Alberto is the first named storm of 2018, and it comes days before the Atlantic hurricane season officially starts on June 1. Water could reach up to 4 feet above ground in some areas if the peak surge occurs during high tide, the agency said on Facebook.

At 2 a.m. EDT Sunday, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said Alberto was about 380 miles (615 kilometers) south of Apalachicola, Florida, and moving north-northeast at 13 mph (20 kph).


Regardless of its path and intensity, Alberto expected to bring heavy rains of more than 10 inches and flash flooding to western Cuba and southern Florida, the National Hurricane Center said. Along with heavy rains and high winds come rough seas and a threat of rip currents from Florida to Louisiana that can sweep swimmers out to sea.


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