Twitter introduces new 'thread' feature to link tweets together

Yolanda Curtis
December 13, 2017

From what I can tell, there's no limit to how many tweets you can have when creating a thread. Threads as we know them have been possible ever since 2014, when Twitter began linking replies to originating tweets.

Twitter has acknowledged that "hundreds of thousands of threads are tweeted every day", but sometimes they can be hard for some people to craft properly.

Users can continue to add tweets to the thread by tapping the plus icon until they're done.


With hundreds of thousands of tweets per day, according to Twitter, the feature should make it easier to follow mega-threads that have become increasingly common on the social media site.

For people who love threads on Twitter, things are about to get better when Twitter's new feature will be available to more users.

Twitter posts about a topic, typically fired off in rapid succession by someone intent on writing more than allowed by the character limit, have been referred to as "tweetstorms". That said, Twitter, which has absolutely no other pressing issues on its site at the moment, has made a decision to cater to tweetstormers with a new update.


The Threads feature looks like Twitter's latest attempt to make its platform more user-friendly. For those reading tweets, there's a new "Show this thread" label.

Users have always been able to unofficially go on long rants, also known as tweetstorms. Now, once you have composed a tweet and used all your characters, you will see a "+" button in the composer to add another tweet in order to create a thread. However, there were some notable challenges to this method for some users and it was also hard sometimes to view all the tweets.

Twitter says threads will begin rolling out today to everyone on iOS, Android and the web, to reach the full user base over a few weeks' time.


The product changes are part of Twitter's effort to address concerns that its network is hard to use, which analysts have said is one reason why it's not picking up users as quickly as investors would like.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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