Boeing Loses Super Hornet Deal With Canada To Second-Hand Australian Fighter Jets

Andrew Cummings
December 7, 2017

News of the expected delay comes as the government is moving ahead on the purchase of used fighter jets from Australia instead of brand-new Super Hornets from Boeing to temporarily bolster Canada's CF-18 fleet.

Canada was expected to buy 18 new Super Hornets from Boeing, but sources told Reuters Tuesday that Ottawa will announce plans to buy used Australian F/A-18s next week instead, as the older planes are the same model that Canada now has in its fleet.

The Canadian government has canceled a planned fighter-jet purchase from Seattle-based Boeing, apparently in retaliation for a trade dispute with the Trump administration, the Reuters news service reported Tuesday.

Featured image courtesy of Wikipedia.


The offices of Public Works Minister Carla Qualtrough and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, who share responsibility for military procurement in Canada, both declined to comment.

"If Canada kicks Boeing out, I think that will be deeply unfortunate for us both".

The Australian planes come with another built-in advantage, said defence analyst David Perry of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute: Canada has long since learned how to keep them in service. "It would be a deeply unfortunate outcome", he said.

In addition, industry sources said it remains an open question whether Ottawa will be saving money by buying second-hand Australian jets that are almost as old as Canada's CF-18s. The aircraft will almost certainly be cheaper than the Super Hornets, and easier to incorporate into Canada's existing fleet, since they are nearly identical to the CF-18, and won't require new training or infrastructure.


No U.S. company makes a C-series rival.

The final ruling in the case is expected next year, but the relationship between Boeing and Canada has nosedived since.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the country "won't do business with a company that's busy trying to sue us and put our aerospace workers out of business".

Bombardier denies any wrongdoing and says Boeing can not prove it was harmed by the Canadian company's actions because it did not offer Delta any planes of its own. It has been the standard line in Ottawa for months that Boeing, having failed to act as a trusted or valued partner, has effectively been shut out of any new federal contracts.


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