Rohingya Flee Myanmar, Only to be Exploited in Bangladesh

Cheryl Sanders
November 15, 2017

The military said that its report was based on interviews with 3,217 Rohingya villagers, whose citizenship has not been recognized in the country and were referred to in the report as "Bengalis".

The refugees are fleeing a military operation in which security forces and Buddhist mobs have killed men, women and children, looted homes and torched Rohingya villages.

While world leaders wrung their hands, thousands of Rohingya remained stranded in Burma, on beaches around the mouth of the Naf River, hoping to find a boat to make the short, sometimes perilous crossing to Bangladesh.

Targeted Young children in one of the refugee camps where pimps and human traffickers roam looking for women and children to force into prostitution
Targeted Young children in one of the refugee camps where pimps and human traffickers roam looking for women and children to force into prostitution

A wave of refugees began fleeing the country in late August after Myanmar's response to an attack by Rohingya militants on more than 20 police posts that the government said left 12 members of the security forces dead.

Amnesty International's regional director for Southeast Asia James Gomez said in a statement that "once again, Myanmar's military is trying to sweep serious violations against the Rohingya under the carpet ... it has no intention of ensuring accountability - it's now up to the global community to step up to ensure these appalling abuses do not go unpunished".

"After recording countless stories of horror and using satellite analysis to track the growing devastation we can only reach one conclusion: These attacks amount to crimes against humanity".


Human rights groups poured scorn on Tuesday on a Tatmadaw investigation into alleged atrocities against Rohingya Muslims, branding it a "whitewash" and calling for United Nations and independent investigators to be allowed into Burma.

"The Burmese military's absurd effort to absolve itself of mass atrocities underscores why an independent worldwide investigation is needed to establish the facts and identify those responsible", Brad Adams of Human Rights Watch, said in a statement on Tuesday.

"The Burmese military's absurd effort to absolve itself of mass atrocities underscores why an independent worldwide investigation is needed to establish the facts and identify those responsible", said Brad Adams, Asia director at HRW.


"The Burmese authorities have once again shown that they can't and won't credibly investigate themselves", Adams added.

He also didn't give any indication that he spoke to Myanmar's de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, about the conflict. "They killed Hindus and other ethnic minorities". "It's very much what people expect of Canada and it comes as no surprise when we bring it up", Trudeau said.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is set to meet later this month with Suu Kyi, who has been chastised over her handling of the crisis, which she once blamed on "fake news". But Tillerson, who has repeatedly condemned the violence, has stopped short of labeling it as ethnic cleansing.


Other reports by iNewsToday

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