New research: A drink a day increases cancer risk

Henrietta Brewer
November 8, 2017

According to the National Cancer Opinion Survey conducted by ASCO earlier this year, 70% of Americans do not identify alcohol as a risk factor for cancer, and only 38% are limiting their alcohol intake as a way to reduce the risk of cancer. They include tighter restrictions on the days and hours of alcohol sales; higher taxes on alcohol; limiting alcohol advertising to youth; and providing alcohol screening and treatment at medical visits.

Heavy drinkers of both genders increase their risk of head and oral cancers by more than 500 percent because tissues come into direct contact with alcohol carcinogens.


The American Society of Clinical Oncology, which represents numerous nation's top doctors, is warning people about the ties between drinking and cancer.

It's a simple tip that could keep your cancer risk at bay.


Even those who drink moderately, defined by the Centers for Disease Control as one daily drink for women and two for men, face almost a doubling of the risk for mouth and throat cancer and more than double the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, compared to nondrinkers. The connection between rising alcohol intake and cancer has been substantially confirmed. The kind of drink does not appear to matter, but experts say a beer or glass of wine here and there is highly unlikely to cause harm. It links drinking alcohol to at least seven types of cancer. "We don't have randomized trials, but sometimes when you start looking at the coherence of all the evidence, including the observational epidemiology, the lab studies, the mechanistic studies, you begin to see a picture and get more clarity". For example, discouraging alcoholic beverage companies from exploiting the color pink or pink ribbons to show a commitment to finding a cure for breast cancer given the evidence that alcohol consumption is linked to an increased risk of breast cancer.


Other reports by iNewsToday

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER