More GOP Senators Oppose Health Bill, Killing It for Now

Henrietta Brewer
July 18, 2017

She said this kind of variation is completely normal in the United States, and that an uninsured American would be "very fortunate" to pay that Medicare amount for the bill. "There are people out there in nursing homes, there are children who can't take care of themselves, there are people who depend on it", Kenney said.

"I think you have to give some confidence to the CBO", said Arkansas GOP Gov. Asa Hutchinson, although he added that it's hard to estimate the true impact of the legislation because it would allow individuals to choose what kind of coverage they want.

The Republican senator from Arizona is recovering from brain surgery performed Friday to remove a almost 2-inch blood clot from above his left eye.


Despite the latest holdup, the Senate's No. 2 GOP leader, John Cornyn of Texas, vowed to bring the legislation to a vote as soon as McCain recovers. "I don't think Republicans should put their name on this".

"Time is not the problem in the present health care bill", Schumer (D-N.Y.) told reporters. They also say the plan would leave consumers with fewer insurance options, so "millions of more individuals will become uninsured". Heather Carter, a Republican from Cave Creek, said cutting Medicaid threatens 400,000 people who have gained insurance through the Affordable Care Act's coverage expansion and also the state's health care system as a whole. That's a 70 percent increase in Medicaid spending over the course of a decade.

The revised Senate bill still includes an estimated $657 billion in Obamacare tax cuts, according to Vox. ABC's Jonathan Karl asked. "It has produced premium increases that are very troubling and hard for people to afford, particularly those who don't get the subsidies under the current law", she said.


In a statement Sunday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said the bill had funding that would "ensure" low-income adults had access to affordable and quality care. "Yes, I believe as soon as we have a full contingent of senators, we'll have that vote".

"Should we proceed, have careful hearings and look at what we can do to make sure that the Medicaid program can continue to be there for future generations without bankrupting the federal budget?"

But in recent days, Johnson had warmed up to the bill, and said he was on board with the key vote that would have opened up the bill for debate on the Senate floor.


Moderate Republican Senator Susan Collins, who opposes the bill, said that the major concern for her were the cuts to Medicaid, the government health insurance programme for the poor.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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