UK's May confident on power-saving deal

Andrew Cummings
June 18, 2017

While she is ultimately expected to reach a deal, a source in the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) told Reuters that an agreement to support her minority government was not likely before next week. Without a so-called confidence and supply deal with the DUP, her party risks losing the vote next week on the Queen's Speech, which lays out the agenda for the government.

Parliament now "deserves a say", he said, adding that there was "perhaps an opportunity to consult more widely with the other parties on how best we can achieve it".

Speaking in Paris, the Prime Minister insisted that the timetable for Brexit talks remained "on course" and said negotiations would begin next week.

Her failure to win a majority has put May under pressure over her Brexit plans from inside and outside her party and has prompted complaints about her choice of partner due to the DUP's stance on social issues such as gay marriage.

Q: Have we ever seen a similar deal in United Kingdom politics before?


Foster will nearly certainly ask for greater investment in Northern Ireland as part of the deal, as well as guarantees on support for pension plans and for winter fuel allowances for older people.

Instead, the shock outcome has left May weakened among her Conservative Party and thrown open her Brexit strategy to criticism from peers, some of whom want to ditch the current plan to leave the European Union single market and customs union.

Even the idea of an alliance is complicated, however.

Sinn Fein has warned such a move undermines powersharing talks in Northern Ireland and the party's seven MPs have flown to London where they will hold a briefing with reporters.

Sinn Fein's Stormont leader Michelle O'Neill said: "I will be making it very clear that any deal between the Tories and the DUP can not be allowed to undermine the Good Friday and subsequent agreements".


Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn turned Mrs May's election slogans against her, claiming a link-up between the Tories and DUP would be a "coalition of chaos".

The PM told the backbench 1922 Committee on Monday a deal with the DUP would not affect power-sharing talks in Northern Ireland or LGBT rights.

"But, let us be clear and organized and once the negotiations have started we should be well aware that it'll be more hard to move backwards", he noted.

"The Labour Party stands ready to offer strong and stable leadership in the national interest", he said.

"My preoccupation is that time is passing - it's passing quicker than anyone believes - because the subjects we need to deal with are extraordinarily complex from a technical, judicial and financial point of view".


Michel Barnier, the EU's chief negotiator, protested that it had been almost three months since Mrs May triggered Article 50, beginning the process of leaving the bloc.

Other reports by iNewsToday

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER