City in Iran Breaks Weather Records with 129°F Temperature

Cheryl Sanders
June 30, 2017

The temperature in the Iranian city of Ahvaz climbed Thursday to a blistering 129 degrees, a record high for the Middle Eastern country and among the hottest temperatures ever recorded on Earth.

Kapikian posted a tweet saying that level of heat was a "new absolute national record of reliable Iranian heat" and that it was the hottest temperature ever recorded in June across mainland Asia. On the morning of June 17, the temperature there dropped to a low of 111.6 degrees. But even more impressive is that the extreme temperature may be one of the world's hottest reliably measured temperatures ever.


According to Weather Underground the temperature in the city of Ahvaz hit 129.2 degrees at both 4:51 p.m. and 5 p.m. local time.

Officially, Death Valley has set the record for the hottest temperature on July 10, 1913 at 134°F or 57°C, the daily said. But Burt posted a devastating critique of that measurement in October 2016, concluding it was "essentially not possible from a meteorological perspective", and that the weather observer committed errors. That means that if Weather Underground's claims of the high temperature at Ahvaz, Iran are correct, that record has been tied. By way of comparison, today the high temp on Ahvaz, a city of about a million people, was a comparatively cool 108F.


While those figures might sound nearly suffocating the city's 1.1m inhabitants would have actually felt even hotter as the heat index (which takes humidity into account) reached a whopping 142 degrees. In fact Europe, and in particular the United Kingdom suffered from a major heatwave culminating in Wednesday's recorded spike of 94.1 degrees at London's Heathrow Airport. Dew points above 90 are quite rare.

Thursday marked the second straight day of record heat in Ahvaz. In January, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed 2016 as the hottest year on record, marking the third consecutive year of record-high global temperatures.


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