Justice Gorsuch: Senate Confirms Trump's First SCOTUS Pick

Cheryl Sanders
April 9, 2017

Neil Gorsuch, the 49-year-old federal judge nominated by President Donald Trump as supreme court justice, was confirmed to the life-long position on Friday, restoring a conservative majority to the nine-member United States supreme court. Angus King (I-ME), the letter garnered support from numerous same Republicans who voted to change the Senate's rules for Supreme Court filibusters on Thursday, including Collins, and by numerous same Democrats who voted to change the rules for lower court and executive branch filibusters in 2013, including Coons. Poised to obtain the majority in Congress and the presidency, Republicans refused to consider then-President Barack Obama's nominee, Judge Merrick Garland.

The final confirmation vote came after Senate Republicans rewrote the chamber's rules, voting to eliminate the 60-vote filibuster threshold on Supreme Court nominees.

Democratic Sens. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.), Joe Manchin (W.Va.) and Joe Donnelly (Ind.) voted with Republicans in favor of Gorsuch's confirmation.

The move is likely to fuel ideologically driven nominations from presidents in the future, dealing a powerful blow to the bipartisanship normally seen on Supreme Court nominees.


"I was honored and proud to vote to confirm Judge Gorsuch, and I am certain he will continue to show remarkable leadership, integrity, and even-handedness as our next Associate Justice to the Supreme Court".

The vacancy on the nine-judge bench has left the court to pass over many controversial issues, possibly to avoid a 4-4 stalemate.

Gorsuch's confirmation turned contentious when Democrats took the unprecedented step of filibustering the nomination yesterday.

If Trump successfully nominates conservative justices to fill their roles, the court's ideological makeup will be altered, possibly for decades.


The Supreme Court is now in recess.

Democrats had been filibustering Gorsuch's nomination for several days before the GOP voted to change the confirmation rules. Many Republicans bemoaned the rule change but blamed Democrats for pushing them to it.

Gorsuch will be sworn in on Monday in two ceremonies, an earlier private ceremony followed by a public ceremony, the White House said.


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