Obama Stopped Taking Donald Trump's Calls After Inauguration

Cheryl Sanders
March 10, 2017

Trump's startling claim of presidential abuse of power, made without evidence in a series of tweets early Saturday, capped a week in which the positive reaction to his address to Congress quickly evaporated amid the swirl of allegations - and revelations - about contacts between Trump aides and Russia's ambassador to the US, both during and after a presidential election Russian Federation is believed to have meddled in.

Nunes announced that the first public hearing of his committee's investigation would take place on March 20 and would include testimony from FBI Director James Comey, who asked the Justice Department over the weekend to refute the president's wiretapping claim. Obama's team denied the claim nearly immediately, and voters have now learned that the former president was "livid over the accusation", according to a March 8 report from the Wall Street Journal.

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee said they will ask the White House for details about reports of contacts between the White House and the Justice Department concerning the FBI's review of whether the Russian government unlawfully influenced the US presidential election.

The committee's letter, addressed to Dana Boente, the acting Deputy U.S. Attorney General, also asks for copies of any such orders actually issued by the court and any electronic surveillance warrants related to Trump or his associates issued past year by a federal judge or magistrate under an wideranging anti-crime law. But by midafternoon, after returning from golf, he appeared to realize he had gone too far, although he still believed Mr. Obama had wiretapped him, according to two people in Mr. Trump's orbit.


This may be the source of why Trump made a decision to say that Obama had him wiretapped, and has viciously attacked him personally and professionally.

"The point of - if I'm understanding the point of [the tweets] - is he's asking the question about whether or not he was - was he or any of his associates targeted", Nunes said.

"There's no question that something happened", Spicer said.

"He cares about all those things much more than what President Trump tweets at the TV each morning".


The department, led by Trump loyalist Jeff Sessions - who's embroiled in his own scandal and facing calls for his resignation as attorney general - has yet to say a word. Part of the reason that we have asked the House and Senate to look into this is because of that'. GOP bill would roll back internet privacy rules Mr. President, make this deal.

Representative Nunes talking to reporters on Russian probe issue.

'That's one of the issues we have asked the Senate and the House to look into, ' Spicer responded.

Both the Senate and House intelligence committees plan public hearings in the coming weeks.


Last week, Attorney General Sessions, a close Trump confidant, recused himself from the Russian Federation probe after news broke that he had met with Russia's ambassador to the United States past year.

Other reports by iNewsToday

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